Pattern / Response

Artist residency 2018

13_rachel sketch4.jpg

I was artist in residence at Glasgow University's School of Engineering in 2018.

I worked with Prof Nikolaj Gadegaard and his Biomedical Interfaces at Glasgow research group on their ongoing research into cells and surface pattern. There are many crossovers between my research and theirs; the interaction of patterns and shapes, pattern perception, order vs disorder, control vs accident, repetition... the generation and fabrication of surface patterns and an interest in the material properties of surfaces and printing processes. 

Prof Gadegaard and I started talking about the nano grid patterns his team are working with, and this sparked some new ideas for both of us. This residency allowed us the time to work together for six months to take these ideas further. I'm grateful to have been funded by The European Research Council (FAKIR 648892) and Creative Scotland on this project.

Print experiments on the studio wall.

Print experiments on the studio wall.

The project was triggered by a conversation I had with Prof Gadegaard about moiré patterns, which gave him an idea about biological matrices within the body. This led to some screenprinting experiments which helped us discuss it in visual terms and raised more questions

The project was triggered by a conversation I had with Prof Gadegaard about moiré patterns, which gave him an idea about biological matrices within the body. This led to some screenprinting experiments which helped us discuss it in visual terms and raised more questions

Water jet cut moiré pattern (originally screen printed) on steel for relief etching at Glasgow Print Studio.

Water jet cut moiré pattern (originally screen printed) on steel for relief etching at Glasgow Print Studio.

Relief etching.

Relief etching.

I shared an office with Marie Cutiongco and Paul Reynolds, who were both working on the response of stem cells to surface topography. Lots of conversations (and drawing) about different dot patterns and how cells respond to them. Why do cells respond differently to different dot patterns? Why do certain amounts of disorder within a pattern affect the potential formation of bone?

Cell biologist Marie Cutiongco and bioengineer Paul Reynolds in the office.

Cell biologist Marie Cutiongco and bioengineer Paul Reynolds in the office.

Comparing notes with Paul.

Comparing notes with Paul.

Studio wall, screen prints of two controlled disorders. Marie’s research looks at why different different levels of disorder within a surface pattern affect cell response.

Studio wall, screen prints of two controlled disorders. Marie’s research looks at why different different levels of disorder within a surface pattern affect cell response.

Measuring distances.

Measuring distances.

Arrangements.

Arrangements.

Point to points.

Point to points.

Points to points

Points to points

Series of lino cuts - controlled disorder dot pattern/electrobeam lithograpy.

Series of lino cuts - controlled disorder dot pattern/electrobeam lithograpy.

The mechanics of a protein signal cascade.

The mechanics of a protein signal cascade.